Liver function test

£14.70

The liver function test is a clinically validated and certified home medical diagnostic test for the detection of elevated concentration of ALT and AST enzymes in whole blood (liver enzyme test).

Testing ALT and AST in the blood is essential for the assessment of the liver physiological status. You carry out the analysis by yourself at home and get the result in 10 minutes.

The test is highly accurate, ISO13485 compliant and CE0483 certified for measuring elevated levels of ALT and AST at home.

Discreet delivery. You will receive the liver function test kit in an unlabeled packaging so that nobody will know what is inside the package.

Order now, or contact us at self-testing@sanotest.co.uk if you have any questions before you buy the test.

Description

Information about the liver function test Liver-Screen

The liver function test is particularly beneficial in the assessment of the liver physiological status.

The test detects the abnormal concentration of liver enzymes ALT (alanine aminotransferase) and AST (aspartate aminotransferase) in whole blood.

The test is commonly named also as the liver enzyme test, ALT blood test or AST blood test.

Measuring ALT and AST enzymes in blood with this test is very easy. You carry out the analysis in three steps:

  1. withdraw blood from a fingertip,
  2. add the blood and buffer to the testing device,
  3. wait 10 minutes for the result.

Individuals usually need 5-10 minutes to complete the liver function test at home. Above that, there is an additional 10-minute waiting time for the result to appear.

The test is manufactured in France and is ISO 13485 compliant and CE certified by Notification body 04831. The test is very accurate. In clinical trials, it showed a correct result in 89.2% of cases.

The live function testing kit includes all required accessories to carry out the analysis at home, anonymously, and it comes with easy-to-follow instructions for use.

The liver function test also comes with the Sanotest Quality Guarantee. It will be replaced to you free of charge in case you were not able to obtain the result.

When you should check your liver health?

It is important to note that individuals with damaged liver or liver disease do not necessarily experience any symptoms at all.

Liver disease in Europe is a severe health concern with increasing cases of cirrhosis and liver cancer.

The United Kingdom is among countries with growing mortality due to liver disease over the last 40 years.2

There are different types of liver disease. Most commonly liver disease develops because of alcohol abuse (alcohol-related liver disease), obesity (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease), viral infection (hepatitis), genetic predisposition (haemochromatosis) and immune system-related issues (primary biliary cirrhosis).3

Risk factors for the development of liver disease

Among the European population, predominant risk factors for liver disease are alcohol abuse, obesity and type 2 diabetes, hepatitis B and C infection.4

Symptoms of liver disease

When and if liver symptoms develop, individuals experience them as dark urine or light-coloured stool, loss of appetite, yellowish eyes or skin (jaundice), abdominal pain and swelling, fatigue, nausea.

You should check your liver health regularly and especially if you experience symptoms of liver problems or if you recognize with yourself one or more risk factors.

Why testing ALT and AST in blood?

ALT and AST testing in the blood are of great value in the assessment of the physiological status of the liver.

Although alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is the most widely used clinical biomarker of liver health,5 it is not only measured to detect liver disease, but also to monitor overall health.6

Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) are enzymes found mainly in the liver, but also found in red blood cells, heart cells, muscle tissue and other organs, such as the pancreas and kidneys.7

In the case of liver injury, ALT and AST enzymes pass from liver cells into the bloodstream and increase the concentration of ALT and AST enzymes in the blood.

An increased concentration of ALT and AST enzymes in the blood is a clinical sign of liver injury.

ALT and AST enzymes pass from cells to the blood before the appearance of clinical symptoms of liver damage8; therefore, testing for ALT and AST in the blood is extremely beneficial for the early diagnosis of liver injury.

Benefits of regular testing of the liver function at home

Individuals can have a damaged liver and not experiencing any symptoms. Therefore regular assessment of the liver function is a crucial preventative measure for identifying early signs of liver injury.

Measuring the concentration of ALT and AST enzymes in the blood at home is fast, convenient and completely anonymous.

You perform the analysis by yourself at home and get the result in only 10 minutes.

You do not need to send a sample of your blood in the laboratory. You receive the liver function test kit at home with all the accessories you need to perform the test by yourself.

How accurate is the liver function test?

The liver function test is 89.2% accurate. The accuracy of the test has been validated in a clinical performance evaluation study.

Results of this liver function test have been compared with the results of the reference medical laboratory method. In 89.2% of cases, results correlated.

The test is also very reliable. It is manufactured in France under strict conditions defined by the ISO 13485, and it is CE certified in Germany by the Notification body 0483.

How to perform the liver function test at home

Testing with this liver function test is straightforward and completely discreet. You only need to follow step-by-step instructions for use that come with the testing kit, and you will complete the analysis instantly.

The liver function test is a serology test. You need to collect a small sample of blood from a fingertip. Accessories for blood collection come with the kit.

You carry out the analysis in three steps:

  1. withdraw blood from a fingertip,
  2. add the blood and buffer to the testing device,
  3. wait 10 minutes for the result.

Individuals usually need 5-10 minutes to complete the test. Above that, there is an additional 10-minute waiting time for the result to appear.

You should read instructions for use before you start the testing procedure. Individuals usually do not have difficulties using the test. Still, in case you find it difficult, we are here to help you. Contact our customer service.

How to interpret the result of the liver function home test?

Results of the liver function home test are interpreted visually as positive, negative or invalid.

Negative result: Negative result means that the ALT and AST concentrations in blood are within normal limits.

Positive result: Positive result appears in case of either ALT or AST concentration in blood is above the normal range (more than 80 IU/L). You should consult your doctor for further investigation.

Invalid result: the Sanotest Quality Guarantee applies. Please contact us.

Literature:

1 Evropska komisija. Tools and Databases, Legislation. Available at: https://ec.europa.eu/growth/tools-databases/nando/index.cfm?fuseaction=directive.nb&refe_cd=EPOS_43805 (17. 08. 2020)
2 Pimpin L, Cortez-Pinto H, Negro F, et al. Burden of liver disease in Europe: Epidemiology and analysis of risk factors to identify prevention policies. J Hepatol. 2018;69(3):718-735.
3 Department of Health and Social Care. Liver Disease. Available at:  https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/liver-disease/ (18.08.2020)
4 The European Association for the Study of the Liver. HEPAHEALTH Project Report. Risk factors and the Burden of Liver Disease in Europe and Selected Central Asian Countries. Available at: https://easl.eu/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/EASL-HEPAHEALTH-Report.pdf (18.08.2020)
5 Ozer J, Ratner M, Shaw M, Bailey W, Schomaker S. The current state of serum biomarkers of hepatotoxicity. Toxicology. 2008;245(3):194-205.
6 Liu, Z., Que, S., Xu, J., & Peng, T. (2014). Alanine aminotransferase-old biomarker and new concept: a review. International journal of medical sciences, 11(9), 925–935.
7 Huang, X. J., Choi, Y. K., Im, H. S., Yarimaga, O., Yoon, E., & Kim, H. S. (2006). Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST/GOT) and Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT/GPT) Detection Techniques. Sensors (Basel, Switzerland), 6(7), 756–782.
8 Vroon DH, Israili Z. Aminotransferases. In: Walker HK, Hall WD, Hurst JW, editors. Clinical Methods: The History, Physical, and Laboratory Examinations. 3rd edition. Boston: Butterworths; 1990. Chapter 99.

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